A unique October walk in partnership with Lost Rivers and The Bentway.

Lost Rivers: The Bentway and Garrison Common – Past Present Future – Stories of the Garrison Common and the creeks surrounding Old Fort York. A few months ago we were approached by The Bentway regarding an upcoming art exhibition they were planning, our discussions led to our president, Ellen Schwartzel, giving the artists Striped Canary Read More

City-Wide Celebration of Stewardship and Volunteering

Toronto Field Naturalists along with the Toronto Nature Stewards and A Park for All will be taking part in city-wide celebration of stewardship and volunteering event on Saturday, October 1st from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm. The event will take place at the Middle Mill Stewardship site located at 44 Beechwood Drive, Toronto. This will Read More

Public walks are back.

We are happy to be able to offer public walks again. Starting in July 2022, we will start offering one public walk per month. Our July public walk will take place on July 7th in Woodbine and Ashbridge’s Bay Parks and will be lead by Bob Kortright. This will be a nature and heritage walk. Read More

Walks update

Happy Summer! We are happy to announce that our walks program will become more like what it was pre-pandemic. Starting in July registration will no longer be required for our walks. Members will be able to bring guests again. We ask that each member bring only one guest on a walk. Our public walks will Read More

Winter Walks

The walks advisory committee and walks coordination team is working hard to put together a good selection of walks for members this winter. Please be sure to check the Walks Page each month for the walks list. In the preparation of going out for walks this winter be it on one of our guided walks, Read More

Magwood Park wetland

Aggie’s Wildflower Walk 2021

For some twenty years now TFN member and voice of the Humber River, Madeleine McDowell, has led fellow members on her annual “Aggie’s Wildflower Walk”, a two hour journey through the world of Agnes Dunbar Moodie Fitzgibbon, illustrator of Canadian Wildflowers. Published in 1868, Canadian Wildflowers is considered one of the most important early botanical Read More

Self-Guided Walk: Best 15 Minute Walk in the City

With some four-hundred identified species of wildflower, shrub, and tree to enjoy, and deep history stretching back to the earliest days of Toronto (York), this might be the best fifteen minute walk our city has to offer. Distance: 600m, circular routeDifficulty: Easy (paved path, mostly flat. One short staircase – see Waypoint #6 below)Washrooms: None Read More

Self-Guided Walk: Ecological restoration in the Don

We enjoy thinking that our walks in Toronto’s natural areas are visits to remnants of wilderness that have endured centuries of city-building. However, after 200 years of growth, there is virtually no place in our city that’s not been transformed time and time again. Much of the natural heritage you enjoy is actually the result Read More

TFN Member at the Fight the Phrag Stewardship Event

Green Terrors and Fight The Phrag!

On Saturday, October 20th, TFN members descended on the lower Don to help EcoSpark and the City of Toronto’s Community Stewardship Program (CSP) “Fight The Phrag” in the Beechwood Wetland. Participants received full training and equipment on site, learning a manual removal technique pioneered by TFN Walk Leader and phrag-crusader, Lynn Short – a protocol Read More

Walk Leader Training, Sept 23, 2018

Notes from our Hike Leader Training Outing

Yesterday proved a perfect time for our Hike Leader Training Outing in Taylor Creek Park – the weather was warm, the trails were busy, and fall flowers were abloom in all directions! The perfect complements to a 5km stroll full of lively discussion. Our most sincere thanks to all of the enthusiastic TFN Members who Read More

The Toronto Field Naturalists wish to acknowledge this land through which we walk. For thousands of years it has been the traditional land of the Wendat, the Seneca, and most recently, the Mississauga of the Credit River. Today it is still the home to many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to be on this land.