New England Aster in flower

April Newsletter now available

Our April 2021 Newsletter is now available for download, and print copies should be arriving by Canada Post very soon! Features include: Tree of the Month – Eastern cottonwood; Toronto’s Iridaceae and Relatives: Part II; The Flowers that Bloom in the Spring Tra La!; TFN Photography Group; The Art of Mindful Drawing; Leslie Street Spit Concerns; Read More

Natural Garden Exemptions – Have Your Say!

When Nina-Marie Lister’s garden blew up the media in 2020, many TFNers shook their heads in dismay. The City of Toronto had just spent years drafting and passing its official Pollinator, Ravine, and Biodiversity Strategies, and yet Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 489, an antiquated bylaw meant to wag a scolding finger at those Torontonians who Read More

Storytime in the Garden: The Boreal Forest with Lindsey Carmichael

Our friends at the Toronto Botanical Garden will be hosting a family-friendly (ages 6 and up) Zoom Webinar with Lindsey Carmichael, author of more than 20 STEM books for children and young adults! Join this award-winning children’s author as she leads your family in an exploration of the boreal forest – the largest, most northern Read More

New England Aster in flower

March Newsletter now available

Our March 2021 Newsletter is now available for download, and print copies should be arriving by Canada Post very soon! Visit our Members Only section now! The access password for our Members Only area is provided in every email that announces the release of a new issue of our newsletter. If you have misplaced the Read More

TFN’s 2021 Nature Images Show

Our annual Nature Images show was, by every measure, a huge success this year with a hundred attendees on Zoom and twenty-one presenters (eleven participating for the first time!). Very special thanks to Lynn Miller for organizing such a fantastic event and, of course, to all of our presenters who generously shared their images & Read More

New England Aster in flower

February Newsletter & Members Only Update

Our February 2021 Newsletter is now available for download, and print copies should be arriving by Canada Post very soon! A few other member only features have also been released recently, including an opportunity to contribute to our new Self-Guided Walks program! Visit our Members Only section now! The access password for our Members Only Read More

Self-Guided Walk: Ecological restoration in the Don

We enjoy thinking that our walks in Toronto’s natural areas are visits to remnants of wilderness that have endured centuries of city-building. However, after 200 years of growth, there is virtually no place in our city that’s not been transformed time and time again. Much of the natural heritage you enjoy is actually the result Read More

Great winter watch: Borealis

Borealis, a much-anticipated nature film by Kevin McMahon, has been made available for free streaming on the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) website. “In his new feature documentary Borealis, acclaimed director Kevin McMahon (Waterlife) travels deep into the heart of the boreal forest to explore the chorus of life in Canada’s iconic wilderness. How do Read More

New England Aster in flower

December Newsletter & Members Only Update

Our December 2020 Newsletter is now available for download, and print copies should be arriving by Canada Post very soon! But that’s just the start of the features & content available in our Member Only area! Login now to watch the recording of November’s lecture, Shorebird stopover ecology in the 3rd largest wetland in the Read More

Wait, this again? Bill 229 threatens to undermine conservation in the province

In what may seem much like a scene from the movie Groundhog Day to many Ontarians, Nov 5th’s provincial omnibus budget Bill 229 includes schedules that once again work to diminish the effectiveness of our Conservation Authorities and threaten protections for endangered species. According to Ontario Nature “Schedule 6 of omnibus Budget Bill 229 proposes Read More

The Toronto Field Naturalists wish to acknowledge this land through which we walk. For thousands of years it has been the traditional land of the Wendat, the Seneca, and most recently, the Mississauga of the Credit River. Today it is still the home to many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to be on this land.